Logo Banner Bolsover Home Page Help Button Written Statement Button Appendices Button Location Map Button Proposals Map Button Inset Map Button
Menu Introduction Themes & General Principals Housing Employment Shopping & Town Centres Community Facilities, Recreation, Leisure & Tourism Transport Conservation of the Historic & Built Environment Countryside & the Natural Environment Implementation, Monitoring & Review Environmental Appraisal of the Local Plan Parking Requirements Residential Land Supply 1998 Affordable Housing Industrial Land Supply 1998 Planning Decision Matrix List of Special Industrial Uses Use Classes Order Existing Shopping Floorspace & Projected Requirements List of Nature Conservation Sites List of Policies Relevant to the Whole Plan Area, within Settlement Frameworks, and in the local Countryside. Glossary of Terms
CHAPTER 5

SHOPPING AND TOWN CENTRES

BACKGROUND

5.1 Throughout Britain retailing is becoming ever more important as a source of employment. The 1981 Census of Employment showed approximately 890 jobs of this kind within Bolsover District (5.0% of the total) while in 1991 the number was approximately 1,290 (6.9% of the total). In addition, since the opening of the Derbyshire Designer Outlet Store at Pinxton/South Normanton in October 1998, 103 residents of Bolsover District have gained employment, out of a total of 664. Also between 1994 and 1998 the combined total retail floorspace within the four main town centres in the District has increased by 3,091 square metres. (See Appendix 8). This is likely to have further increased the number of jobs in this sector within Bolsover District. Over the same period, however, more residents of Bolsover District are travelling to places like Chesterfield, Alfreton, Meadowhall, Worksop, Sutton-in-Ashfield and Mansfield, for shopping purposes.

5.2 Shops also make a major contribution to residents' quality of life, and although the past decade has seen a growth in the attractiveness of large centres this has been at the expense of local facilities. Whether through choice or necessity people have travelled further and further to do their shopping, incurring the expense and adverse effects on the environment that go with increased use of transport. In this equation local businesses have lost out, as has the wider economy of the plan area (because the shops also buy services locally such as cleaning, shopfitting, accounting and deliveries) and the environment, due to increased traffic and pollution.

5.3 In terms of the services they provide for residents, local shops are particularly important for people with restricted mobility and people with no choice but to use public transport. The 1991 census showed that 36.4% of households in the district did not have access to a car. No definitive figures are available to say how many people with a disability there are in the plan area, but to that unknown number can be added people over the age of seventy and mothers with young children, many of whom are likely to choose to shop locally on foot rather than use public or private transport.

5.4 Local shops should be supported and welcomed because of the valuable service they provide for local communities. Improvement and development needs to be encouraged not only in the town centres, but also in the groups of shops which serve the smaller settlements such as Pinxton, Tibshelf, Creswell and Whitwell, and 'corner shops' have to be nurtured. Notwithstanding this clear statement of intent, the local planning authority accepts that modern retail requirements may not be met in the small centres that exist in the plan area. The local plan contains proposals to allow significant improvement of shopping facilities to serve the full needs of the residents of the area. The following principles are important:

1. The first preference for retail developments is town centre sites, followed in sequence by edge of centre sites, local centre sites and other sites within settlement frameworks (the sequential approach).

2. Flexibility to allow growth of town centres and local shopping areas.

3. Major shopping development to be allowed provided that:

a)   it does not affect the vitality and viability of existing centres;
b)   it is located on major public transport routes or roads and provides good access to those routes;
c)   it is located close to the population served, minimising the need for travel.

5.5 Town centres are not only important for shopping purposes, but also provide service, community, business and office facilities. Town centres need to be managed in a way which will improve their ability to compete with nearby regional and sub-regional centres and with out-of-town shopping developments. In particular there is a need to consider car parking levels, servicing, pedestrian access, and environmental improvements.

AIMS

5.6 The aims of this local plan with regard to shopping and town centres are as follows:

1. Maintain and improve the existing major shopping centres of South Normanton, Shirebrook, Bolsover and Clowne.

2. Foster the integrated management of these town centres, co-ordinating actions, controls, advice and encouragement to improve the character, facilities and competitiveness of the four centres.

3. Encourage improvement and development in the smaller shopping areas, particularly Pinxton, Tibshelf, Creswell and Whitwell.

4. Encourage individual 'corner shops' and specialist leisure and or factory outlet shops in other appropriate places.

5. Consider the need for, and identify acceptable sites for, larger scale shopping developments which cannot be accommodated within existing shopping centres.

TOWN CENTRES

5.7 In the local plan area South Normanton, Shirebrook, Bolsover and Clowne are identified in the Derbyshire Structure Plan (1990) as existing major shopping centres which are to be maintained and enhanced by further improvements (including those for people with disabilities) to shopping and other predominantly retail facilities, car parking, accessibility and the environment.

5.8 These town centres have undergone considerable changes in terms of shopping provision in recent years. Shopping floorspace surveys were carried out in 1994 and 1998. These have been compared to a previous survey carried out in 1987. (The precise details of these surveys are tabulated in Appendix 8). There have been considerable increases in convenience goods floorspace (e.g. food, newspapers and drinks) in Shirebrook and Bolsover and lesser increases in Clowne and South Normanton. As regards comparison goods floorspace (e.g. clothes and electrical equipment), there have not been any significant changes in any of the four centres except Shirebrook, where planning permission was granted for a retail furniture sales shop in 1994. This development has a total floorspace of 2,124 square metres. What is also significant is that the number of vacant shops has increased in South Normanton, Shirebrook and Bolsover, indicating a considerable amount of spare capacity in terms of available floorspace.

5.9 If the retail trends of the late 1980s and the 1990s were to continue, the projected growth rate of shopping floorspace in the four town centres is minimal for convenience goods but significantly more (43%) for comparison goods. These projections are based on estimated retail expenditure figures used in West Nottinghamshire and details of how they were calculated are shown in Table 2, Appendix 8. Government advice in PPG6 - 'Town Centres and Retail Developments' (1996) indicates that in the interests of sustainability there should be a greater emphasis on shopping provision in existing centres rather than out-of-town shopping centres. The national trend prior to that was to allow out-of-town shopping to develop, but to the detriment of existing centres. This anticipated growth in expenditure on comparison goods should be encouraged to take place in the four town centres and in the local centres.

5.10 The boundaries of the four town centres are shown on the proposals map and define the proposed limits where town centre uses will be permitted. The boundaries are drawn to include the existing groups of shops together with any adjoining property or land which the local planning authority considers generally suitable for town centre uses or improvements to the existing facilities such as new retail development, markets, bus stopping places or car parking. Designation of property/land within the town centres does not take away the right of existing authorised uses to remain.

5.11 Proposals for the establishment of an open market or car boot sales within town and local centres in the district will be considered in relation to policies SAC 1 and SAC 7. Similar proposals for sites situated outside defined centres will be considered under policy SAC 13.

5.12 SAC 1      SHOPPING DEVELOPMENT IN SOUTH NORMANTON, SHIREBROOK, BOLSOVER AND CLOWNE TOWN CENTRES

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR NEW RETAIL DEVELOPMENT OR REDEVELOPMENT, CHANGES OF USE TO RETAIL USE AND EXTENSIONS FOR RETAIL USE WITHIN THE TOWN CENTRES OF SOUTH NORMANTON, SHIREBROOK, BOLSOVER AND CLOWNE, AS SHOWN ON THE PROPOSALS MAP, PROVIDED THAT THE PROPOSAL:

1) IS COMPATIBLE WITH THE SCALE AND CHARACTER OF THE TOWN CENTRE;

AND
2) IS ACCEPTABLE IN TERMS OF PUBLIC TRANSPORT ACCESSIBILITY, TRAFFIC GENERATION AND PARKING PROVISION;

AND
3) WOULD NOT MATERIALLY HARM THE VITALITY AND VIABILITY OF THE CENTRE OR ANY NEIGHBOURING SHOPPING CENTRE.

SOUTH NORMANTON TOWN CENTRE

5.13 The potential of South Normanton as a shopping centre has been constrained for some time by the linear street pattern and the lack of adequate servicing/parking provision. A recent development to the rear of the main car park on Market Street has opened up the opportunity, if demand exists, for a further extension of shopping and town centre uses by approximately 1.64 hectares.

5.14 Such an extension is not straightforward, however, as it would be against other provisions of the local plan to develop the site of a football pitch and the problem of a suitable alternative access arrangement onto Lees Lane (or Market Street) would have to be resolved.

5.15 SAC 2      EXPANSION OF SOUTH NORMANTON TOWN CENTRE

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR THE EXPANSION OF SOUTH NORMANTON TOWN CENTRE, IN THE AREA OF MARKET STREET/LEES LANE, AS SHOWN ON THE PROPOSALS MAP, PROVIDED THAT:

1) THE FOOTBALL PITCH IS REPLACED;

AND
2) ADEQUATE REAR SERVICE FACILITIES ARE PROVIDED;

AND
3) A SECOND ACCESS IS PROVIDED IN ADDITION TO THE EXISTING MARKET PLACE CAR PARK ACCESS.

NON-RETAIL USES IN TOWN CENTRES

5.16 Developers of many office and service uses generally prefer town centre sites and find themselves competing with retail uses to occupy premises in shopping centres. Such a mixture of uses is traditional and also complementary since people who use the office and service outlets also get attracted to the shops, while some shoppers find it convenient to go to the offices and service outlets. All users benefit from the public transport services which usually focus on such areas.

5.17 The balance of uses described above provides a flow of customers. While the office and service activity may be able to operate in a variety of circumstances, however, the success of an area in attracting customers purely to shop is likely to depend on there being a reasonable group of shops and service outlets which they can visit. For this purpose the most important thing is to keep as many as possible of the ground floor properties in the town centre in use as facilities serving visiting members of the public. Again, to make the shopping areas attractive to shoppers it is also important to maintain their traditional character.

5.18 The intention of the local plan is to take a broader view of town centres and to encourage a variety of uses as well as retail. Hot food shops, however, are covered by a further policy (SAC 9) because they present special difficulties in respect of hours of operation, smell and litter.

5.19 SAC 3      NON-RETAIL USES IN TOWN CENTRES

WITHIN THE TOWN CENTRES AS DEFINED ON THE PROPOSALS MAP, PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR MIXED USES IN ADDITION TO SHOPS (A1), INCLUDING FINANCIAL AND PROFESSIONAL SERVICES (A2), COMMUNITY AND SOCIAL USES (D1 AND D2), AND DWELLING HOUSES AND FLATS (C3)*, PROVIDED THAT:

1) THE DEVELOPMENT WOULD NOT MATERIALLY HARM THE VITALITY AND VIABILITY OF THE TOWN CENTRE OR ANY NEIGHBOURING SHOPPING CENTRE;

AND
2) THE DEVELOPMENT IS COMPATIBLE WITH THE SCALE AND CHARACTER OF THE TOWN CENTRE;

AND
3) IN THE CASE OF RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT THE PROPOSAL WOULD NOT HAVE A MATERIALLY HARMFUL EFFECT ON A PREDOMINANT SHOPPING FRONTAGE.

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL ONLY BE GRANTED FOR OTHER NON-RETAIL DEVELOPMENTS IN TOWN CENTRES WHERE THEY DO NOT PREJUDICE THE VITALITY AND VIABILITY OF THE TOWN CENTRE.

*As defined in the Town and Country Planning (Use Classes) Order 1987, as amended. (See Appendix 7).

UPPER FLOORS IN TOWN CENTRES

5.20 The local planning authority is aware of the need for town centres to have life outside normal shop and office hours, so that proposals to utilise underused upper floors for other purposes such as clubs, restaurants and flats may be favourably received. Special measures may be necessary to safeguard neighbours' amenities, for example by means of sound insulation. Commercial or leisure use of upper floors is unlikely to be appropriate outside town centres where greater priority ought to be placed on the residential amenities of neighbours. Public funding may be available to convert vacant accommodation above shops to residential use through "Living Over The Shop" schemes which could be introduced as part of the district's regeneration initiatives in the future. (Change of use from some Class A1 and A2 uses to a single flat are permitted development under Class F and Class G of Part 3 of the Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) Order 1995.)

5.21 Whilst proposals for use of upper floors can take advantage of central locations they can seldom offer proper access for people with disabilities and frequently lack parking spaces. Despite these disadvantages it is considered important to make use of the resource where possible. Where it is proposed to use the accommodation as flats or small scale private offices, the local planning authority may be prepared to grant planning permission without parking provision. If premises are to be open to visiting members of the public, however, provision for people with impaired mobility and a level of parking provision appropriate to the hours of opening and the potential number of visitors will be required.

5.22 SAC 4      UPPER FLOOR DEVELOPMENT IN TOWN CENTRES

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR FLATS OR SMALL-SCALE PRIVATE OFFICE DEVELOPMENT, RESTAURANTS, CAFES OR LEISURE ACTIVITIES IN UPPER FLOORS WITHIN DEFINED TOWN CENTRES, PROVIDED THAT:

1) THE DEVELOPMENT DOES NOT MATERIALLY HARM THE AMENITIES OF NEIGHBOURING OCCUPIERS;

AND
2) PROVISION OF ACCESS IS MADE FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES IF THE DEVELOPMENT IS OPEN TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC.

WHERE APPROPRIATE, CONDITIONS WILL BE IMPOSED TO CONTROL OPENING HOURS AND OPERATING CONDITIONS IN ORDER TO MITIGATE THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF THE DEVELOPMENT.

REAR SERVICING IN TOWN CENTRES

5.23 As part of a variety of measures aimed at improving the attractiveness of town centres there are a number of proposals for reducing the on-street servicing on the main shopping streets. This is particularly important where the shopping streets have been pedestrianised or where there are proposals for future pedestrianisation (paragraphs 7.37 to 7.40). Combined with traffic calming measures to reduce the speed of traffic in town centres, this will lead to a more pleasant and safe environment for shoppers and other town centre users.

5.24 The chief opportunity to introduce new rear servicing measures in South Normanton is likely to occur as part of the town centre expansion described in paragraphs 5.13 to 5.15. As part of that scheme rear servicing of premises on the west side of Market Street and of any new shop premises will be sought.

5.25 In Shirebrook, both Market Square and Main Street suffer from on-street servicing. It is, therefore, proposed to provide rear servicing arrangements between Victoria Street and Patchwork Row and on the north side of Main Street (between Main Street and the Health Centre). The exact locations of these rear servicing arrangements are shown on the proposals map.

5.26 In Bolsover, rear servicing facilities are available for most of the premises between Market Place and Cotton Street with access into a service yard from Middle Street. Elsewhere off-street servicing facilities are limited, although it is hoped that off-street servicing facilities can be provided when opportunities arise through proposals for new development.

5.27 In Clowne, if the relief road is implemented, it is intended to pedestrianise Mill Street and to service premises from the rear. It is, therefore, proposed that rear service access areas will be provided as part of new development to the east of the proposed Mill Street relief road. All new building development and any alterations to existing buildings will be designed in such a way as not to prejudice future servicing from the rear.

5.28 SAC 5      REAR SERVICING IN TOWN CENTRES

PLANNING PERMISSION FOR NEW BUILDINGS, IMPROVEMENTS TO EXISTING BUILDINGS AND CONVERSIONS TO SHOPPING USE WILL ONLY BE GRANTED IN TOWN CENTRES IF THEY ARE DESIGNED SO AS NOT TO PRECLUDE THE TAKING OF ACCESS FROM THE REAR.

LAND REQUIRED FOR REAR SERVICING, AS SHOWN ON THE PROPOSALS MAP, WILL BE SPECIFICALLY SAFEGUARDED FROM DEVELOPMENT AT:

1)   MARKET STREET/LEES LANE, SOUTH NORMANTON (AS PART OF AN EXPANSION OF SOUTH NORMANTON TOWN CENTRE)
2)   VICTORIA STREET/PATCHWORK ROW, SHIREBROOK
3)   MAIN STREET NORTH, SHIREBROOK
4)   MILL STREET NORTH, CLOWNE

CAR PARKING IN TOWN CENTRES

5.29 Although the district council will continue to encourage increased use of public transport as an alternative to the private car, it is recognised that there is still the need for suitably located car parks in the town centres to serve shoppers and tourist visitors (policy TRA 14). The availability of car parking can affect the viability of town centres and it is, therefore, an important factor to consider. The shortage of car parking spaces becomes especially apparent on market days in Shirebrook and Clowne.

5.30 In South Normanton, if the town centre is extended as proposed in policy SAC 2, there will be a need for additional car parking facilities to be provided, for the town as a whole. The best location for this would be between Lees Lane and Market Place.

5.31 In Shirebrook, a site between Main Street and the Health Centre, with access off Main Street, is identified as suitable for a car park. In conjunction with the proposed car park, provision will be made to retain the footpath links to Main Street and allow for future rear service access to shops. Some additional parking may be possible as part of the Victoria Street/Main Street rear-servicing scheme.

5.32 In Bolsover, a new public car park off Town End has recently been constructed, in accordance with proposals included in the Old Bolsover and Hillstown Local Plan. There now appears to be adequate car parking available for shoppers in Bolsover. There are, however, some problems with parking when large events are staged at Bolsover Castle, and English Heritage is examining how these might best be resolved. In addition, the completion of the interpretation centre at the castle is likely to generate an increase in demand for parking, requiring the upgrading or extension of the coach parking bay. There is potential for making improvements to the car parking adjoining The Drome nightspot, with the possibility of an extension to it on the piece of land adjacent to The Angel public house. In conjunction with the proposed pedestrianisation scheme round the war memorial (see paragraph 7.39), Middle Street would be closed to through traffic.

5.33 In Clowne, there are several areas where improved and additional parking facilities are to be provided. It is the intention to locate the main town centre parking area(s) on the land to the north of Mill Street and west of The Green. A car park providing 86 spaces has recently been developed as part of the extensions to the Co-op supermarket. The eventual capacity of this overall provision will depend upon the size and nature of the associated new shopping development, and to some extent on the design of the Mill Street relief road. A car park has been developed on Rectory Road on part of the former station goods yard, providing car parking for Clowne College. In addition a further car park has been developed by the college adjoining the church hall on Rectory Road.

5.34 SAC 6      CAR PARKING IN TOWN CENTRES

LAND REQUIRED FOR CAR PARKING WILL BE SAFEGUARDED FROM DEVELOPMENT AT:

1)   MARKET STREET/LEES LANE, SOUTH NORMANTON (AS PART OF AN EXPANSION OF SOUTH NORMANTON TOWN CENTRE)
2)   MAIN STREET NORTH, SHIREBROOK
3)   MILL STREET, CLOWNE.


LOCAL CENTRES AND SHOPPING FRONTAGES

5.35 There are local centres at Pinxton, Broadmeadows, Newton, Tibshelf, Carr Vale, Creswell, Whitwell and Barlborough where further shopping development (A1) and financial and professional services (A2) or food and drinks sales (A3) would be appropriate in principle. The same centres are also appropriate locations for community facilities and small scale office uses.

5.36 Smaller groups of shops exist elsewhere in the plan area serving more local catchments and the service they provide is particularly important for those who lack transport or cannot use public transport. They also contribute to the objective of making a sustainable pattern of development since they bring everyday shopping within walking or cycling range of residents.

5.37 SAC 7      LOCAL CENTRES AND SHOPPING FRONTAGES

WITHIN LOCAL CENTRES AND SHOPPING FRONTAGES OF PINXTON, BROADMEADOWS, NEWTON, TIBSHELF, CARR VALE, CRESWELL, WHITWELL AND BARLBOROUGH AS DEFINED ON THE PROPOSALS MAP PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR NEW RETAIL DEVELOPMENT OR CHANGES OF USE TO RETAILING (A1), FINANCIAL AND PROFESSIONAL SERVICES (A2), DWELLING HOUSES AND FLATS (C3) OR COMMUNITY AND SOCIAL USES (D1 AND D2) PROVIDED THAT THE PROPOSAL:

1) IS COMPATIBLE WITH THE SCALE AND CHARACTER OF THE LOCALITY;

AND
2) WOULD NOT MATERIALLY HARM THE VITALITY AND VIABILITY OF THE CENTRE OR ANY NEIGHBOURING SHOPPING CENTRE.

Use classes are defined in the Town and Country Planning (Use Classes) Order, 1987, as amended. (See Appendix 7).

INDIVIDUAL LOCAL SHOPS

5.38 The important role played by the "corner shop" in most communities in the district is recognised and welcomed by the local planning authority. Corner shops or local convenience stores are particularly important for the elderly population and those people who do not own a car. They also contribute to the objective of making a sustainable pattern of development as they bring everyday shopping within walking or cycling range of residents.

5.39 SAC 8      INDIVIDUAL LOCAL SHOPS

WITHIN THE SETTLEMENT FRAMEWORKS, PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR NEW SHOPS OR EXTENSIONS TO EXISTING SHOPS, PROVIDED THAT THE PROPOSAL:

1) IS COMPATIBLE WITH THE SCALE AND CHARACTER OF THE LOCALITY;

AND
2) DOES NOT MATERIALLY HARM THE VITALITY AND VIABILITY OF ANY NEIGHBOURING SHOPPING CENTRE;

AND
3) MEETS THE NEEDS OF THE RESIDENTS OF THE SETTLEMENT.

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPROVEMENTS IN TOWN AND LOCAL CENTRES

5.40 As part of the overall objective to encourage people to shop locally it is of paramount importance to make the shopping environment as attractive and safe as possible. Physical and environmental improvements such as new paving, street furniture, planting and improved lighting can help to attract more customers which in turn can increase a shopping centre's viability. Unfortunately, resources for this type of work are limited. However, opportunities will be taken in the course of new development and redevelopment proposals to negotiate with developers for some associated environmental improvements. When resources become available the local planning authority will prepare detailed schemes showing appropriate environmental improvements for Pinxton, South Normanton, Tibshelf, Shirebrook, Bolsover, Clowne, Creswell and Whitwell. Hopefully resources for this type of work will become available during the plan period, either through public funding or through various grants such as the Single Regeneration Budget or National Lottery funds. Shirebrook, Bolsover and Creswell already have the benefit of some funding for this type of work through the successful bids for Single Regeneration Budget money.

HOT FOOD SHOPS, CAFES, RESTAURANTS, PUBLIC HOUSES AND SOCIAL CLUBS

5.41 Hot food shops and other facilities serving food and drink raise a number of specific issues. They provide an important service for members of the public but they can have an adverse effect on the amenity of an area (particularly where they are open late at night or at weekends). The local planning authority will give special attention to hours of opening, parking provision for customers and, in the case of take-away food shops, to the adequacy of measures for litter disposal, control of noise, and control of odour from cooking and wastes. These considerations are likely to make town centres or established local shopping areas the most acceptable locations for developments of this kind. Predominantly residential areas should be avoided to minimise the potential disturbance to residents. Exceptionally, the re-use of existing buildings in the countryside may be considered appropriate for such uses in locations close to settlements or in locations where they can meet the needs of users of the countryside, such as walkers, cyclists and tourists. Proposals which are likely to attract significant additional journeys by car-borne customers will be resisted. (See also policies ENV 3 and ENV 4).

5.42 SAC 9      HOT FOOD SHOPS, CAFES, RESTAURANTS, PUBLIC HOUSES AND SOCIAL CLUBS

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR HOT FOOD SHOPS, CAFES, RESTAURANTS, PUBLIC HOUSES AND SOCIAL CLUBS WITHIN SETTLEMENT FRAMEWORKS AS DEFINED ON THE PROPOSALS MAP PROVIDED THAT:

1) THERE WOULD BE NO HARMFUL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS THROUGH THE DESIGN, SERVICING ARRANGEMENTS, STORAGE OF REFUSE, NOISE, ODOURS, LIGHT, LITTER OR TRAFFIC DISTURBANCE;

AND
2) THE PROPOSAL IS COMPATIBLE WITH THE SCALE AND CHARACTER OF THE LOCALITY.

THE LOCAL PLANNING AUTHORITY WILL IMPOSE CONDITIONS ON ANY PLANNING PERMISSION TO CONTROL OPENING HOURS, IMPACT OF ODOURS, NOISE AND LIGHT WHERE RESIDENTIAL AMENITIES COULD OTHERWISE SUFFER.

RETAIL USES AT INDUSTRIAL OR WAREHOUSING SITES

5.43 Land and/or buildings which are in an existing employment use, or which are identified for that purpose in the local plan, are an important resource for the economic regeneration of the district. The local planning authority will try to ensure that land allocated or currently in use for employment purposes will not be lost to other uses, and planning permission will not normally be granted for retail development of these sites or buildings, except in town centres.

5.44 SAC 10      RETAIL DEVELOPMENT AT INDUSTRIAL OR WAREHOUSING SITES

OUTSIDE TOWN CENTRES AND LOCAL CENTRES PLANNING PERMISSION WILL NOT BE GRANTED FOR RETAIL DEVELOPMENT OF SITES OR BUILDINGS WHERE INDUSTRY OR WAREHOUSING IS THE EXISTING USE, OR THE USE ALLOCATED IN THE LOCAL PLAN, UNLESS IT CAN BE DEMONSTRATED THAT THE PROPOSALS WOULD NOT PREJUDICE OTHER PROVISIONS OF THE LOCAL PLAN. IN SUCH CASES THE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT MUST ACCORD WITH THE REQUIREMENTS OF POLICY SAC 13.

RETAIL USES AT NURSERIES, FARMS AND FACTORIES

5.45 Sometimes firms whose main business is growing produce or manufacturing particular articles wish to sell goods at the place where they are produced. In most cases these activities do not compete with or generally affect the viability of existing shopping areas. Provided that they are limited to selling goods manufactured on the premises, such sales are considered ancillary to the use and do not require planning permission. This can also apply to other producers such as farms and horticultural nurseries. Planning permission will, however, be required where the retail development also involves the sale of goods which do not originate from the premises or which are available principally for the employees on site. In these instances planning permission will normally be granted provided that the use will not affect the vitality and viability of local shops or have an adverse impact on the local environment, that highway safety is not adversely affected and that adequate arrangements are made for parking.

5.46 SAC 11      RETAIL USES AT HORTICULTURAL NURSERIES, FARMS AND FACTORIES

WHERE PLANNING PERMISSION IS REQUIRED FOR RETAIL DEVELOPMENTS ASSOCIATED WITH HORTICULTURAL NURSERIES, FARMS AND FACTORIES, PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED PROVIDED THAT:

1) THE SALE OF GOODS WHICH HAVE NOT BEEN PRODUCED ON SITE ARE ANCILLARY TO THE SALE OF GOODS PRODUCED ON THE SITE OR ARE FOR THE PRINCIPAL USE OF EMPLOYEES ON THE SITE;


AND
2) THE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT WOULD NOT MATERIALLY HARM THE VITALITY AND VIABILITY OF EXISTING SHOPPING CENTRES AND INDIVIDUAL LOCAL SHOPS.

 

RETAIL DEVELOPMENTS OUTSIDE DEFINED TOWN AND LOCAL CENTRES

5.47 Recent government advice acknowledges that, if new retail development cannot be accommodated either within or on the edge of an existing centre, only then will out-of-centre locations be considered. Where such developments are proposed in out-of-centre locations, regard will be had to the need for the proposed development, and that where a proven need can be demonstrated, that this need cannot be met on a site within or on the edge of an existing centre. Such sites must have existing or potential access to the public transport network, which should be improved where necessary to ensure the shopping facility caters for a wide cross-section of the public and is not designed to meet purely car-borne trade. Policies TRA 1 and TRA 7 cover these issues. The proposal should also not adversely affect the vitality and viability of existing town or local centres.

5.48 SAC 12      RETAIL DEVELOPMENT ON THE EDGE OF DEFINED TOWN AND LOCAL CENTRES

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR NEW RETAIL DEVELOPMENT OR REDEVELOPMENT INCLUDING CHANGES OF USE TO RETAILING AND EXTENSIONS FOR RETAIL USE ON THE EDGE OF TOWN AND LOCAL CENTRES AS DEFINED ON THE PROPOSALS MAP PROVIDED THAT:

1) THERE IS A NEED FOR THE DEVELOPMENT;

AND
2) THE DEVELOPER CAN DEMONSTRATE THAT NO SUITABLE SITES OR BUILDINGS ARE AVAILABLE WITHIN AN EXISTING CENTRE IN THE AREA THE DEVELOPMENT IS PROPOSED TO SERVE;

AND
3) THE SCALE AND NATURE OF THE DEVELOPMENT IS COMPATIBLE WITH THE SCALE AND CHARACTER OF THE CENTRE;

AND
4) THE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT, EITHER INDIVIDUALLY, OR CUMULATIVELY WITH RECENTLY COMPLETED DEVELOPMENTS AND OUTSTANDING PLANNING PERMISSIONS, WOULD NOT MATERIALLY HARM THE VITALITY AND VIABILITY OF EXISTING TOWN OR LOCAL CENTRES;

AND
5) THE ADDITIONAL TRAFFIC WHICH THE DEVELOPMENT WOULD GENERATE CAN BE SATISFACTORILY AND SAFELY ACCOMMODATED BY THE SURROUNDING ROAD NETWORK;

AND
6) THE DEVELOPMENT WOULD BE EASILY ACCESSIBLE BY A CHOICE OF MEANS OF TRANSPORT;

AND
7) THE SITE WOULD BE EASILY ACCESSIBLE FOR PEDESTRIANS AND PEOPLE WITH A DISABILITY;

AND
8) THE DEVELOPMENT IS OF A HIGH QUALITY DESIGN WHICH IS SYMPATHETIC TO ITS SURROUNDINGS IN TERMS OF SCALE, DESIGN AND MATERIALS;

AND
9) THE SITE IS NOT REQUIRED FOR ANY OTHER USE.

THE LOCAL PLANNING AUTHORITY WILL REQUIRE AN ACCOMPANYING REPORT ASSESSING THE ABOVE CRITERIA FOR APPLICATIONS FOR RETAIL DEVELOPMENT OVER 2,500 SQ. METRES GROSS FLOORSPACE. SUCH ASSESSMENTS MAY OCCASIONALLY BE NECESSARY FOR SMALLER DEVELOPMENTS DEPENDING ON THE RELATIVE SIZE AND NATURE OF THE DEVELOPMENT IN RELATION TO THE CENTRE.

5.49 SAC 13      RETAIL DEVELOPMENT OUTSIDE DEFINED TOWN AND LOCAL CENTRES

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR NEW RETAIL DEVELOPMENT OR REDEVELOPMENT INCLUDING CHANGES OF USE TO RETAILING AND EXTENSIONS FOR RETAIL USE OUTSIDE THE TOWN AND LOCAL CENTRES DEFINED ON THE PROPOSALS MAP PROVIDED THAT:

1) THERE IS A NEED FOR THE DEVELOPMENT;

AND
2 THE DEVELOPER CAN DEMONSTRATE THAT NO SUITABLE SITES OR BUILDINGS ARE AVAILABLE, FIRSTLY, WITHIN OR, SECONDLY, ON THE EDGE OF, AN EXISTING CENTRE IN THE AREA THE DEVELOPMENT IS PROPOSED TO SERVE;

AND
3) THE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT, EITHER INDIVIDUALLY, OR CUMULATIVELY WITH RECENTLY COMPLETED DEVELOPMENTS AND OUTSTANDING PLANNING PERMISSIONS, WOULD NOT MATERIALLY HARM THE VITALITY AND VIABILITY OF EXISTING TOWN OR LOCAL CENTRES;

AND
4) THE ADDITIONAL TRAFFIC WHICH THE DEVELOPMENT WOULD GENERATE CAN BE SATISFACTORILY AND SAFELY ACCOMMODATED BY THE SURROUNDING ROAD NETWORK;

AND
5) THE DEVELOPMENT WOULD BE EASILY ACCESSIBLE BY A CHOICE OF MEANS OF TRANSPORT;

AND
6) THE DEVELOPMENT DOES NOT ADD SIGNIFICANTLY TO THE OVERALL NUMBER AND LENGTH OF CAR TRIPS;

AND
7) THE DEVELOPMENT IS OF A HIGH QUALITY DESIGN WHICH IS SYMPATHETIC TO ITS SURROUNDINGS IN TERMS OF SCALE, DESIGN AND MATERIALS;

AND
8) THE SITE IS NOT REQUIRED FOR ANY OTHER USE;

AND
9) THE DEVELOPMENT IS NOT AN INTRUSION INTO THE OPEN COUNTRYSIDE.

THE LOCAL PLANNING AUTHORITY WILL REQUIRE AN ACCOMPANYING REPORT ASSESSING THE ABOVE CRITERIA FOR APPLICATIONS FOR RETAIL DEVELOPMENT OVER 2,500 SQ. METRES GROSS FLOORSPACE. SUCH ASSESSMENTS MAY OCCASIONALLY BE NECESSARY FOR SMALLER DEVELOPMENTS DEPENDING ON THE RELATIVE SIZE AND NATURE OF THE DEVELOPMENT IN RELATION TO NEARBY CENTRES.

RETAIL PARK

Planning permission has been granted on the derelict site of the former South Normanton Colliery, on the south side of the A38, for the Derbyshire Designer Outlet Store. The permission is for five retail units, totalling 15,950 m2 sales area and a further 465 m2 including a food court with associated kiosks. The permission includes car parking, highways improvements and most important of all a new junction with the A38 which will facilitate development of land to the south and west, and north of the A38 in the longer term.

5.51 The junction improvement and the provision of new jobs is considered to be an important element in the revitalisation of the southern part of the plan area. The additional shopping facilities provided by the retail park will help to redress the decline of the major and local shopping centres within this part of the plan area which has led to many more shopping journeys to adjoining major, sub-regional and regional shopping centres than in the past. The retail park will provide a useful shopping facility for the local population as it will be easily accessed by both public and private transport.

RETENTION OF EXISTING SHOP FRONTS.

5.52 The general appearance of town and local centres can make a positive contribution to the success and vitality of a commercial area and to tourism. Traditional shop fronts often include attractive features such as ornate pilasters and wooden fascia boards which are worthy of retention. In view of the fact that a variety of uses will be acceptable in both town and local centres (policies SAC 3 and SAC 7) there is the increased possibility of shops being converted to other uses. Consideration then needs to be given as to whether or not shop fronts should be retained even when the use of the building as a shop has ceased. This decision will need to take into account the style and condition of the shop front and also its location in relation to other shop fronts. Another consideration will be whether or not the building is likely to become a shop again at a later date. In some cases, for example where a shop is located in the centre of a residential area, it is considered unnecessary to retain the shop front. In other cases, for instance in the heart of a town centre, and in particular if it is designated as a conservation area, it is likely to be detrimental to the character of the area to allow the removal of a traditional shop front.

5.53 SAC 14      RETENTION OF EXISTING SHOP FRONTS

IN CONSIDERING PLANNING APPLICATIONS FOR CHANGE OF USE FROM SHOPS TO OTHER USES, TRADITIONAL SHOP FRONTS WILL BE RETAINED WHERE:

1) THERE IS A REASONABLE CHANCE OF THE BUILDING BECOMING A SHOP AGAIN IN THE FUTURE;

AND
2) THE REMOVAL OF THE SHOP FRONT WOULD BE DETRIMENTAL TO THE APPEARANCE AND CHARACTER OF THE SHOPPING FRONTAGE.

DESIGN OF NEW SHOP FRONTS AND ALTERATIONS TO EXISTING SHOP FRONTS

5.54 A well-designed and attractive shop front can contribute to the success of a commercial area. The design of shop fronts should contribute to the character of the area and the building, as well as meet the needs of the shopkeeper and customers. The design should also take into account the needs of people with disabilities and ensure that appropriate access is provided (policy GEN 13).

5.55 Attractive shop fronts can easily be spoiled by the installation of unsightly security grilles or shutters. Due to the increasing levels of crime and vandalism many shopkeepers need to install security measures to defend their shop fronts such as shutters and bollards. A concentration of external roller shutters in a shopping area results in a bleak, depressing frontage and people are less likely to "window shop" outside of shop opening hours, so reducing natural surveillance in the evenings and at weekends and ultimately reducing trade to the individual retailer and the whole group of shops.

5.56 The local planning authority would like to see the use of strengthened glass and/or internal window grilles rather than external fittings. Where new shop fronts are being developed the opportunity should be taken to provide internal security measures, or at least to make an allowance in their design for their future installation. It may not be feasible to introduce internal security measures in existing shop fronts in which case careful consideration should be given to the design of external fittings. External roller grilles should ideally be of a "mesh" or "perforated" design and painted in a dark colour so as to be as unobtrusive as possible. The local planning authority will prepare supplementary planning guidance on the detailed aspects of acceptable designs for security measures on shop fronts.

5.57 SAC 15      DESIGN OF NEW SHOP FRONTS AND ALTERATIONS TO EXISTING SHOP FRONTS

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR NEW SHOP FRONTS (WHETHER ON EXISTING SHOPS OR NEW OR CONVERTED PREMISES) AND FOR ALTERATIONS TO EXISTING SHOP FRONTS, PROVIDED THAT:

1) THE DESIGN PRESERVES OR ENHANCES THE CHARACTER OF THE AREA, AND THE CHARACTER OF THE BUILDING CONCERNED AND ITS NEIGHBOURS;

AND
2) SECURITY MEASURES ARE INCLUDED IN THE DESIGN WHEREVER POSSIBLE OR ALLOWANCE IS MADE IN THE DESIGN FOR THEIR FUTURE INSTALLATION. IN CASES WHERE EXTERNAL SECURITY MEASURES ARE PROPOSED PREFERENCE WILL BE GIVEN TO PERFORATED DESIGNS PAINTED IN A DARK COLOUR.

IN CONSERVATION AREAS AND IN OLDER SHOPPING SETTINGS NEW BUILDINGS OR CONVERSIONS WHICH SHOW A HIGH QUALITY OF MODERN DESIGN WILL BE WELCOMED PROVIDED THAT THEY SHOW RESPECT FOR THEIR CONTEXT. IN SUCH AREAS ALTERATIONS TO EXISTING SHOP FRONTS SHOULD:

1) BE DESIGNED IN SYMPATHY WITH THE ELEVATION AS A WHOLE AND SHOULD RESPECT THE PERIOD OF THE BUILDING IN WHICH THEY ARE FITTED;

AND
2) WHERE APPROPRIATE, INCORPORATE TRADITIONAL DETAILS, FEATURES, PROPORTIONS AND MATERIALS.

AMUSEMENT CENTRES

5.58 The noise and general disturbance generated by amusement centres mean that careful consideration has to be given to their location. Whilst it is recognised that there is a demand for such facilities, problems can occur if they are inappropriately situated, for example near a school. When considering applications for this type of development special attention has to be paid to the impact on the amenity of the surrounding area particularly with regard to noise and likely numbers of people who may use it as a gathering place.

5.59 Although a town or local centre would probably be the most appropriate location for an amusement centre it would still depend on its siting relative to other uses, and would not be acceptable in a conservation area or other site of heritage interest. Where permission is given for amusement centres the local planning authority will consider imposing conditions to minimise the impact of noise, such as self-closing doors, and prohibition of loudspeakers. Further advice can be found in the government's PPG6 - 'Town Centres and Retail Developments' (1996).

5.60 SAC 16      AMUSEMENT CENTRES

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR AMUSEMENT CENTRES IN TOWN AND LOCAL CENTRES PROVIDED THAT:

1) THE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT IS LOCATED AND DESIGNED SO AS TO MINIMISE ITS IMPACT ON THE AMENITY OF THE ADJOINING OR NEARBY PROPERTIES;

AND
2) THE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT IS NOT IN A CONSERVATION AREA, OR CLOSE TO HOUSING, SCHOOLS, HOSPITALS, CHURCHES, HOTELS, OR BUILDINGS OF ARCHITECTURAL OR HISTORIC INTEREST OR OTHER TYPES OF DEVELOPMENT OF A SENSITIVE NATURE.

transparent gif transparent gif transparent gif transparent gif